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Table 2 Five-year period in which the contribution of mortality delay to the increase in life expectancy at birth became persistently larger than the contribution of mortality compression, by sex and country, 1951–2013

From: The timing of the transition from mortality compression to mortality delay in Europe, Japan and the United States

Country Men Women
Japan 1965–1970 1965–1970
USA 1965–1970 1951–1955*
Denmark 1980–1985 1995–2000Ϯ
Finland 1965–1970 1965–1970
Ireland 1985–1990 1975–1980
Norway 1980–1985 1965–1970
Sweden 1965–1970 1955–1960*
UK 1965–1970 1960–1965*
Austria 1970–1975* 1970–1975
Belgium 1970–1975 1970–1975
The Netherlands# 1975–1980 1955–1960
Germany, West 1970–1975 1970–1975
France 1965–1970 1960–1965
Switzerland 1965–1970 1965–1970
Italy 1985–1990 1975–1980
Portugal 1985–1990 1975–1980
Spain 1975–1980 1970–1975
Bulgaria# 2000–2005 1975–1980
Czech Republic# 1990–1995* 1985–1990
Germany, East# 1990–1995Ϯ 1975–1980
Hungary# 1995–2000 1980–1985
Poland# 1990–1995* 1970–1975*
Slovakia# 1990–1995 1985–1990
Lithuania# N/A 1970–1975*
Latvia# N/A 2005-2010
Belarus# N/A 2000–2005
Russia# 2005–2010Ϯ 1995–2000
Ukraine# 2005–2010 1995–2000
  1. N/A = not applicable
  2. #At least two 5-year periods in which declines in e0 occurred, mostly only among men, but for Belarus, Latvia, Russia, and Ukraine for both men and women
  3. *One 5-year period in between in which the contribution of compression was larger than delay
  4. ϮAlso at an earlier point in time, an extended period occurred in which absolute delay was more important than absolute compression: DKF 1951–1980, RFM 1980–1990, DEM 1970–1980